The Raleigh Saltwater Sportfishing Club

THE RALEIGH SALT WATER SPORT FISHING CLUB

Posted on 2012-05-29

In 1976 Bob Goldstein was tired of fishing alone. His wife, his frequent fishing partner, was no longer interested in fighting the cruel weather and long night hours it can take to fish the Outer Banks for drum and bluefish in the late Fall. From Bob’s frustration, the RSWSC was born.

An ad in the News and Observer classifieds brought a handful of devoted salt water anglers to a meeting place in a north Raleigh parking lot. Each fisherman agreed to take the responsibility of speaking or getting a speaker or movie each month.  They met informally for a few years and as membership grew, and the marine resource began to diminish, they decided to formally incorporate on December 12, 1980.

In 1976 Bob Goldstein was tired of fishing alone. His wife, his frequent fishing partner, was no longer interested in fighting the cruel weather and long night hours it can take to fish the Outer Banks for drum and bluefish in the late Fall. From Bob’s frustration, the RSWSC was born.

An ad in the News and Observer classifieds brought a handful of devoted salt water anglers to a meeting place in a north Raleigh parking lot. Each fisherman agreed to take the responsibility of speaking or getting a speaker or movie each month.  They met informally for a few years and as membership grew, and the marine resource began to diminish, they decided to formally incorporate on December 12, 1980.

The bylaws state that the objectives are “to promulgate fellowship, information, sportsmanship, and conservation practices involved in the art of sportfishing.”  Those principles have been the driving force throughout the years since that time.

The RSWSC has tackled a number of tasks over the years. In 1984, then President Dave Tingen, led the Club’s effort to raise awareness of the need for improved artificial reefs.  The Club bought a Grady White and sold raffle tickets to help buy and sink an old liberty ship. All the funds went to the Cape Lookout Artificial Reef Fund.

A tidal wave of governmental red tape prevented the Protector from being sunk but in time Marine Fisheries, the efforts of the RSWSC, the Carteret County Sportfishing Association and many other clubs, the NC Legislature funded the reef program and another ship, the Aeolus, was eventually sunk. NC Marine Fisheries now has an artificial reef plan of which all North Carolina fisherman can be proud.

The RSWSC worked in the early eighties with a number of the other clubs to help form a Federation of NC Saltwater Sportfishing Clubs. The Federation was an all volunteer organization and after a few years dissolved. Club President, David Tompkins tried to get it started again a few years afterwards but, again, volunteers could not make it happen.

In 1987, the recreational King Mackerel fishery was closed and Club President Mike Holleman met with a number of representatives of the fishing clubs and, through the efforts of many other fishermen, the Atlantic Coast Conservation Association of NC was born. The ACCA of NC was given seed money remaining from the Federation, cash donations from many fishing clubs including the RSWSFC, a grant from the Hanes Foundation, and contributions from Grady White and other interested persons. A year later a full time Executive Director was hired and the ACCA (now CCA-NC) is now the largest and most organized recreational fishing sport lobby for marine conservation and saltwater fishermen.

One of the things that the RSWSC feels strongly about is encouraging any effort that supports taking kids fishing. For this reason, the club has contributed as much money as its operating budget could bear to the “Take A Kid Fishing Foundation.” 

Every year, profits from RSWSC Annual King Mackerel Tournament are donated to the Take a Kid Fishing Foundation as well as some other charities. In past years as much as $5000 was donated to TAKF.  Since profits come from KMT pamphlet ad sales and the sale of the fish factors such as poor fishing, the number of entrants, bad weather, a bad economy, or a lack of community businesses supporting ad sales limits the pool of money available for the kids. Hopefully, the tournament revenue generated this year will permit a lot more needy and handicapped kids to enjoy saltwater fishing for the first time in their lives. 

The club has also contributed to Hatteras hurricane relief efforts over the years, the National Coalition for Marine Conservation and the IGFA as well as groups who look after troubled kids and try to get them back on the right track in life. When the Red Tide hit the coast, the club donated $500 dollars to a fundraiser aimed at helping the fishing families in the Atlantic beach area. The club also contributed toward efforts to raise legislative awareness of the benefits of the State’s artificial reef program. 

The Club supported a Saltwater Sport Fishing License for most of its existence provided the money comes back to the resource similar to the license monies raised from hunting and freshwater licenses.  Some club members now serve on DMF’s Coastal Resource Fishery License Committee to assure the projects meet angler needs. 

The RSWSFC monthly meetings are oriented around fishing; how, where, and when. The RSWSC meets the third Tuesday of each month at the NCSU Faculty Club. Meetings are open to the Public.

It publishes a monthly newsletter intended as an open forum for discussion of the issues ranging from education about fishing methods, fishery regulations, to fishery conservation. 

From this beginning, the club grew to its current membership of members and their families.

The Raleigh Saltwater Sportfishing Club

One thought on “The Raleigh Saltwater Sportfishing Club

  • April 28, 2017 at 1:47 am
    Permalink

    Hi, this is a comment.
    To get started with moderating, editing, and deleting comments, please visit the Comments screen in the dashboard.
    Commenter avatars come from Gravatar.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *